SBAC Farnborough: A History


Seaton and East Devon in the Second World War


Lost Cornwall from Magic Lantern Slides


Heathrow Airport: An Illustrated History


Swinging the Lamp: Thames Estuary Tidal Tales


Neolithic Horizons: Changing Communities in the Wessex Landscape


Chillingham: Its Cattle, Castle and Church


Station 115 Shipdham: The Story of a USAF Airfield


Changing York


A History of the Liverpool Waterfront 1850-1890: The Struggle for Organisation


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SBAC Farnborough: A History

Product no.: 978-1-78155-238-4
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  • Beautifully illustrated and written by a leading aviation expert
  • A definitive book on the subject of Farnborough from 1932 onwards
  • Of interest to military historians, aviation enthusiasts and modellers

Home to the famous biennial Farnborough Air Show, the town of Farnborough in the south of England has had a pivotal role in the history of British aviation since flying commenced from the site in 1905. The Royal Aeronautical Establishment was set up there and rapidly expanded as the scene of many significant developments in British aviation for many decades. Over the years, a range of buildings were constructed for various purposes and to house specific functions such as wind tunnels.

Many of these buildings are now listed and protected as part of a museum on the site. Farnborough is best known for its experiments and development of aircraft types. After the Second World War, it played host to a considerable variety of aircraft, including a number of Axis types captured during the war.

Beautifully illustrated and written by a leading aviation expert, SBAC Farnborough: A History is the definitive book on the subject of Farnborough from 1932 onwards.

THE AUTHOR

Peter G. Dancey began his career in aviation as a boy entrant with the RAF. Dancey is an established and critically acclaimed aviation author with a number of successful titles to his name. He lives in Milton Keynes, England. Dancey had previously contributed towards Fonthill Media with British Aircraft Manufacturers Since 1909, The Avro Vulcan: A History (both 2014) and Soviet Aircraft Industry (2015).

FORMAT
Dimensions: 234 x 156 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 176 pages
Illustrations: 132 black-and-white photographs

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Seaton and East Devon in the Second World War

Product no.: 978-1-78155-429-6
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  • Includes reminiscences from most of East Devon, including Seaton, Sidmouth, Exmouth, Honiton and Axminster
  • Illustrated with 50 rarely-seen photographs
  • Written by a well-known local-born historian and curator of Seaton Museum

Although not in the front line of the Second World War, East Devon had its share of privation. It was home to many evacuees, some of whom stayed in the area after the war. Seaton itself was also the site of an internment camp, and home to soldiers from many lands, some of whom were killed fighting for the British cause. Seaton families also lost sons to the war, many of them in heroic circumstances. It was a time when the community came together in a way which had not been seen before or since.

Ted Gosling has collected many fascinating and moving memories from local folk about their own experiences during this unique time. Through their words, and their own snapshots of the era, we can travel back in time to an area which flourished with ‘Dunkirk Spirit’ and made good friends with visiting soldiers from other lands.

Among the reminiscences are tales of Wartime activity in: Seaton, Beer, Colyton, Sidmouth, Axminster, Exmouth, Honiton and Branscombe.

THE AUTHOR

Ted Gosling is a well-known local historian in Seaton and the author of many books on the surrounding area. Ted is also the Curator of Seaton Museum.

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Lost Cornwall from Magic Lantern Slides

Product no.: 978-1-78155-290-2
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  • Foreword by Rick Stein
  • High-quality images on superb quality paper
  • Many previously unpublished images
  • Wonderful underground mining scenes by Burrows


Lost Cornwall from Magic Lantern Slides is gloriously and profusely illustrated with nearly 300 quality illustrations of a bygone Cornwall. The book transports the reader back to a nostalgic past as well as documenting the hard work and play of locals. The original photographs are positives printed on glass plates of subjects varying from men at work in tin mines to chocolate box images of harbour life.

Many photographs would have been available commercially while others were taken by private individuals for lectures at local social evenings. The reader will find the variety of subjects covered fascinating and the logistical difficulties of cumbersome and technically difficult equipment is discussed in detail.

A must read for anyone interested in magic lantern slides or the photographic history of Cornwall.

THE AUTHOR

A proud Padstonian and Cornishman, Malcolm McCarthy was born in Redruth in 1957. After finishing sixth form, he joined the Metropolitan Police in which he served for twelve years, ten of which were on the Thames Division. Returning to Padstow, he worked as a berthing master for 20 years. Retiring in 1998, he has concentrated on transcribing his vast Cornish document collection, which can be viewed at www.cherishedcollection.com. McCarthy has to date written About Padstow, Around Padstow, Padstow Through Time and Padstow History Tour.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 248 x 172 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 176 pages
Illustrations: 286 black-and-white photographs

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Heathrow Airport: An Illustrated History

Product no.: 978-1-78155-511-8
Cover price £18.99
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  • A stunning pictorial history of a much loved and renowned international airport
  • Many previously unpublished photographs from both professionals and enthusiasts
  • A glorious publication that is unmatched by previous accounts
  • Contains many interviews with people behind the scenes as well as leading aviation figures


London’s Heathrow Airport is the busiest international airport in the world and has been for decades. Since its opening in 1946, airlines have beaten a path to its door and nearly seventy years of operation has aroused feelings of appreciation from those who love it and feelings of derision from those who do not. Heathrow has seen the brightness of magnificent beginnings, the dark days of theft and delays, dramas, the mundane everyday routine and everything in between. It has seen the arrival and departure of royalty, the rich and famous, and countless millions of ordinary passengers wanting to go somewhere or get home safely. Now as the airport reaches its seventieth birthday, its position as the world’s premier international hub is under the microscope as airports in Europe seek to attract traffic away from the UK.

Heathrow Airport: An Illustrated History charts the history of the airport through the photographs of those who worked there, who still work there, those who use it and those who are enthusiastic about it.

THE AUTHOR

Kevan James was born amongst the bombs and bullets of the EOKA terrorist campaign in Cyprus where his father, broadcaster Terry James, served with the British Forces Broadcasting Service. After many years working in transport, travel and with young people, James is a freelance writer and photographer specialising in commercial aviation with sport, fashion and politics thrown in. He once considered standing for election as an MP, but decided he could be a bigger nuisance to those who are elected by staying independent.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 248 x 172 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 240 pages
Illustrations: 224 black-and-white photographs

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Swinging the Lamp: Thames Estuary Tidal Tales

Product no.: 978-1-78155-498-2
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  • A book for lovers of sailing amongst salt, marsh and mud
  • Tales about exploring the lost industrial heritage around the Thames estuary
  • An unusual view of the estuary’s edges: a walker’s paradise
  • Swinging the Lamp is of love and enthusiasm for an unknown side of the River Thames


Salt water courses through Nick Ardley’s veins for he was brought up on a Thames spritsail barge and sailed the high seas on ocean-going ships. For many years, he has weaved his way through the Thames estuary’s tidal creeks and rivers, mostly aboard his clinker sloop, exploring and investigating. The Thames estuary is a world of constant flux. It is an artery of modern commerce and archaeology of past industry peppers its rivers and creeks. Flooded islands have become the domain of birds nesting on hummocks of saltings and feeding on mud flats. Rotting wharves are festooned with life and the time-worn ribs of barges the perch for cormorants.

Around all of that, man has created new uses for disused lime, cement and brick docks. Boatyards, marinas and waterside housing have emerged like a water-born phoenix from industrial ashes. Beneath Whimbrel’s swinging lamp, he muses about old souls, the relationship of humble spritsail barge and shoal draft yachts, but all along he is alive with enthusiasm for the environment in this little corner of England.

THE AUTHOR

Nick Ardley was born in 1955 and brought up on a Thames spritsail barge. One of four children, he and his siblings soon became the crew. His working life was spent as an engineer officer with the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. Upon retiring, Ardley fell into writing, being asked to tell his childhood story. He now writes avidly about his love and enthusiasm of sailing amongst the rivers and creeks around the Thames and its estuary discovering its industrial history. His wife, Christobel, and ‘mate’ in his yarns, has grown to love the saltings too.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 248 x 172 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 208 pages
Illustrations: 32 black-and-white and 75 colour photographs

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Neolithic Horizons: Changing Communities in the Wessex Landscape

Product no.: 978-1-78155-299-5
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  • Lavishly illustrated with many rare and unpublished photographs
  • The remarkable archaeological history of Neolithic Wessex – its places, people and monuments
  • The great ceremonial complexes of Stonehenge and Avebury reassessed: how traditions of earth and stone-shifting influenced construction monuments as well as the impact of community intervention on the changing landscape


Neolithic Horizons investigates the communities who built some of our most remarkable and iconic archaeological sites: the great public monuments at Stonehenge, Avebury and others like them. Famous the world over, these monuments are complemented by less well-known and contemporary foci such as the earthen circles at Knowlton, Dorset and Marden. These are seen to be part of an earth-shifting tradition that extends right across the Wessex landscape and traced back to our earliest monuments of long barrows, causewayed enclosures and the enigmatic cursus enclosures.

After Stonehenge, the tradition continued with the construction of enormous numbers of circular burial mounds along the river valleys and hillsides. Indeed, few other regions in Europe, or further afield, can match the scale and intensity of development that we see at these ceremonial complexes.

These places of ritual must nevertheless be viewed as part of a wider landscape, one where features of the land are continually changing according to the influence of local inhabitants. While charting a remarkable archaeological legacy, this book reveals the developing landscape of grassland, settlements and fields. The product of the early farming communities who lived their lives in the shadow of the monuments…

THE AUTHORS

As archaeological investigators for the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments of England and subsequently English Heritage, David Field and David McOmish have spent well over 20 years working on the archaeological landscapes of southern England. During that time, all the major monuments of the Neolithic period were investigated, including Avebury, Stonehenge, Silbury Hil. Their particular brand of earthwork analysis and landscape investigation provides a unique large-scale interpretation of the period. They have prepared numerous reports and journal articles on the subject and written the definitive publication on The Field Archaeology of Salisbury Plain Training Area as well as a companion volume The Avebury Landscape.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 248 x 172 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 192 pages
Illustrations: 41 black-and-white and 30 colour photographs

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Chillingham: Its Cattle, Castle and Church

Product no.: 978-1-78155-522-4

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  • Lavishly illustrated with many rare and unpublished photographs
  • Chillingham Castle with its famous and infamous inhabitants have combined to make this an interesting and fascinating tale
  • Foreword supplied by HRH Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales


This is the first comprehensive book about Chillingham in Northumberland with its unique wild cattle, historic castle, church and family associated with them since the twelfth century. Julius Caesar admired the cattle’s ancestors for their brute strength and Sir Walter Scott immortalised them. They were painted by Sir Edwin Landseer and Archibald Thorburn, and depicted at their best by Thomas Bewick, the master engraver. Charles Darwin studied and wrote about them in the Descent of Man. Historian Simon Schama described the Chillingham cattle as ‘…the great, perhaps the greatest icon of British natural history’.

The castle’s history is chequered and the nobles who lived there even more so. Incest, adultery, witchcraft, torture, kingmakers, traitors, a cricketer and a cowboy are all part of its history, resulting in its modern reputation for cruel and benign ghosts still regularly seen in the castle. Founded around 1184, the country church in its simplicity hides a fifteenth-century tomb described as ‘…one of the finest such monuments in the country outside a cathedral’.

Gloriously illustrated with 200 vibrant colour photographs, Chillingham: It’s Cattle, Castle and Church is edited by Paul G. Bahn and Vera B. Mutimer with a foreword by HRH Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales.

THE AUTHORS

Dr Paul Bahn is an editor of numerous archaeological and humorous books, including Cambridge World Prehistory and Disgraceful Archaeology.

Vera B. Mutimer is a trustee of the Chillingham Wild Cattle Association.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 248 x 172 mm
Binding: hardback
Extent: 224 pages
Illustrations: 200 colour photographs and illustrations

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Station 115 Shipdham: The Story of a USAF Airfield

Product no.: 978-1-78155-495-1
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  • Contains many unpublished ey ewitness accounts
  • A sixty-year history of a unique 600-acre patch of East Anglia
  • Superbly illustrated with previously unseen black and white photographs
  • Stunning images of battle-damaged B-24 Liberators that were bloodied by the Luftwaffe over Nazi Germany


Station 115 Shipdham: The Story of a USAF Airfield tells of a 600 acre Second World War airfield built on Norfolk farmland in the early 1940s. It is a mere 10 minutes’ flying time from Norwich between the market towns of Dereham and Watton. It covers the gestation of the airfield from open arable farmland through the construction phase to its commissioning as a USAAF heavy bomber base in the frontline of the greatest conflict that the world has ever seen.

It covers the activities at the airfield during the war in detail and then moves on to describing its reversion to farmland in the Fifties. It then follows the re-emergence of the airfield, initially as a base for an air-taxi service and then incorporating a crop-spraying operation for the local intensive cereal industry. In the mid-Eighties, it became home to a flight training school and light aircraft maintenance base.

Finally, it evolved into a general aviation airfield providing a home for light aircraft used for recreation by keen amateur pilots in the Norfolk area.

THE AUTHOR

Peter W. Bodle FRAeS started out in life as an engineer, became a designer and then an inventor by inventing the Passive Floor Path marking system for passenger carrying aircraft. The company he started then is now the world’s leader in this technology. Fortunately, its success has allowed him the time to pursue his writing interests and has so far had almost twenty biographies and aviation history published. Bodle was a light aircraft pilot for almost twenty-five years and is married with four children and an ever growing number of grandchildren and great grandchildren.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 234 x 156 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 176 pages
Illustrations: 56 black-and-white photographs

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Changing York

Product no.: 978-1-78155-263-6
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  • The history of York uniquely tol d through its magnificent buildings
  • Covers the Minster and the countless other churches and places of worship
  • An essential guide for visitors and residents describing the rich heritage of York


York is one of Britain’s best preserved cities. Through a combination of sheer luck, the efforts of passionate conservationists and the apathy of the Luftwaffe, many of York’s unique historical treasures survive to this day for visitors and residents to enjoy. Changing York aims to record nearly one hundred of these riches, showing how they were in the past and how they have survived and function today.

We visit the Minster and some of the countless other churches and places of worship, workhouses, almshouses, hospitals, prisons, bridges, walls and the Mansion House – a panoply of treasures which gives an exciting insight into the history of this fine English city. A truly unique feature of the book is the inclusion of photographs from the prestigious and rarely seen Evelyn Collection, held by the Yorkshire Architectural & York Archaeological Society.

These stunning images give an unrivalled snapshot of York life in the early 20th century, showing the city in ways that will fascinate and enthral.

THE AUTHOR

Paul Chrystal is an author of more than twenty-five books and a broadcaster. Ten of his books are on York including A History of Chocolate in York (2012) and The Rowntree Family of York (2013). He writes articles for national newspapers and regularly appears on the BBC World Service and BBC Local Radio. He is married with three children and lives near York.

FORMAT
Dimensions: 235 x 165 mm
Binding: paperback
Extent: 96 pages
Illustrations: 185 colour photographs

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A History of the Liverpool Waterfront 1850-1890: The Struggle for Organisation

Product no.: 978-1-78155-061-8
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A History of the Liverpool Waterfront 1850-1890: The Struggle for Organisation is a comprehensive portrait of labour relations at the port of Liverpool in the second half of the nineteenth century. After a short introductory background to nascent labour organisations from earlier times, it details the history of dockland labour and the persistent efforts of Merseyside workers to achieve union organisation.

In the times when the waterfront was packed with a ‘forest of masts’, before steam finally ousted the wind jammer, this book documents the struggles of the workers and the changes that took place; including detailed descriptions of the increased use of mechanisation in loading and unloading goods.

Based on the experience of Liverpool workers of the marine and waterfront – a high proportion of whom were of Irish descent – this book challenges long established labour history theories of ‘New Unionism’ and the alleged inability of unskilled labouring classes to organise themselves. It breaks new ground in understanding the way in which workers organised and built self-reliance. Many of these workers united in a common cause whether temporarily, or as we see in some examples, surviving from the mid-nineteenth Century until their absorption into the modern unions in existence today.

As well as being a powerful study of labour relations, David Douglass vividly recreates the hustle and bustle of life on the docks in Victorian Liverpool, where at its height eighteen thousand men earned their living in at the dockside.

THE AUTHOR

David John Douglass was born pre-war in Jarrow upon Tyne. A lifelong coalminer in Durham and South Yorkshire, and a leading member of the National Union of Mineworkers, Douglas studied at Ruskin College, Oxford. A graduate of Strathclyde University, Glasgow and Keele University Staffs, he has written extensively on the coal industry, mining communities and National Union of Mineworkers as a worker-historian. In this work, Douglas turns his attention to early dock and maritime labour in the Mersey ports, revealing for the first time the extent of their organisational dynamic and class consciousness.

FORMAT
Dimenions: 234 x 156 mm
Binding: paperback
Pages: 224
Illustrations: 65 b/w photographs

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